Award-winning, Locally-owned; Serving Metropolitan Portland
Award-Winning Tutoring in Portland, Oregon
Call: 503-303-8666

How to Nudge Your Child Towards a STEM Career

Educationally, a STEM path is highly desired by parents because, generally speaking, it offers good opportunities in future life. Students in STEM fields tend to have higher salaries and greater professional opportunities. STEM education also fosters analytical and problem-solving skills, and can play a huge role in breaking down barriers for women and minorities. And yet despite these benefits, schools struggle to guide young people toward STEM subjects, with only around 16% of American high schoolers interested in a STEM career and have strength in math. How can parents turn this around and get their kids interested in a STEM career? Let’s take a look.

STEM is an acronym that stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. The common perception of these subjects is that they’re difficult and, worse, extremely boring. These attitudes can be very difficult to overcome, so it’s where the biggest effort must be made at home.

Find the wonder in science in everyday life

Look around. There is science in almost everything. Let’s just take one simple example: cooking dinner. Think about the techniques (and hard work) that goes into growing and harvesting the fruit and vegetables. Think about the techniques involved in producing that food. And think about the science behind taste. Then there’s the effects on food of cooking. Beyond that one can discover so much about what happens inside our bodies when we eat, especially at the molecular level -- how food gets converted into glucose and how that glucose gets into cells, and how our bodies extract the vitamins and minerals (and what happens to them). And that’s just cooking dinner!

There are things surrounding us that are pretty amazing. Television, construction, cars, trees, pets, the weather -- the list is long. That sense of wonder is key to embracing STEM subjects, and it’s truly sad that it’s not elemental in the way they are taught. At any rate, a bit of excitement will go a long way to changing the way your young one thinks about science.

Embrace mathematics

There’s no getting around it: math is central to everything in the STEM universe. If STEM is a living organism, then math is its DNA. To have any hope at all of a STEM career, one has to be able to pass high-level math courses. The good news is, math needn’t be a terrifying death march through a dark valley of nightmares -- with the right approach, it can actually be fun. No, really! Part of the problem is the way math is taught in school -- it’s usually very dry, repetitive and with little or no connection with the real world.

A central technique in the effort to embrace math is to relate it to real-world examples that the student can relate to. This doesn’t just apply to basic arithmetic, but to advanced concepts too. Formulae on a blackboard come alive when they’re demonstrated using, say, orbital trajectories of spacecraft, or pressure differentials in automotive engines, or data mining techniques. Doing so can help break down psychological barriers and actually lead to excitement about math. Accomplishing it can be difficult, though, most likely requiring extra-curricular activities to supplement classroom learning. Games, books and videos can help, as can a skilled one-to-one tutor.

Spend time with real-world STEM professionals

Many, even most people employed in STEM fields take real pride in their work, and possess a deep excitement about the work they do. You’d be surprised by how many are eager to share their knowledge and experience with curious youngsters. Tours of science labs at local universities, work-shadowing at engineering firms, internships at high-tech startups; a few phone calls or emails may find a willing response.

Of course one must be sure to ensure the safety of one’s children, so do take the standard precautions (for instance going along on a tour). The potential benefits are enormous, because they could stir up a ton of excitement.

Declare war on anxiety

This will help not only the pursuit of a STEM career but the pursuit of a happy life. Young people can get terribly intimidated by science, math and technology courses, so it’s extremely important to tackle that anxiety. Sooth them through high-pressure studying and learning by understanding how stress works in general -- and how it manifests itself in your young person. Be aware of the warning signs and take steps to deal with it before things get ugly.

Most of all, help your student develop the tools to tackle their own anxiety. This will not only help them progress in their STEM efforts, but equip them to deal with many of life’s stumbles and struggles.

Don’t ever ignore anxiety or minimize it. Discuss it openly, and remember that it’s not a sign of weakness or failure. It’s just a normal, human part of being alive. While you’re at it, why not investigate the science of anxiety? You and your child might learn something new!

Local Family Enrollments (Sep-2017)

School / Student grade / Tutoring Program Focus

Wilson HS, 11, Algebra II
Lakeridge JHS, 7, Academic Coaching, X-skills
Portland Jewish Acad. 3, Math Foundations, Study Skills
Oak Creek ES, 3, Reading, Spelling, Comprehension
Lakeridge HS, 11, Physics, Math
Mt Tabor MS, 7, Math, Gen HW Help
Glencoe ES, 4, Math, Gen. HW Help
Jesuit HS, 11, Algebra II, Chemistry
Jesuit HS, 10, Geometry, Physics
Alameda ES, 5, Writing, Acad. Coach, Study Skills
Beaumont MS, 6, Writing, Acad. Coach, Study Skills
West Sylvan MS, Math, Academic Confidence
Oregon State Univ, Coll, Intermediate French
Sellwood MS, 7, Math, Lang. Arts
Duniway ES, 4, Math, Lang. Arts
Vernon K-8, 3, Spanish, Math Foundations
Vernon K-8, 1, Spanish

Career Paths in the Arts You May Not Have Thought Of

When young people think about careers in the arts, they tend to emphasize content creation: artists, actors, musicians, writers and so on. Creators are, of course, the backbone of the arts world, and of course without artists we wouldn’t have all the amazing content that brings so much joy to so many people. The truth is, however, any student choosing a career path in creative fields will face significant challenges. Once out of school, creative professionals will face a great deal of competition, as it can be so risky taking a chance on someone new.

The truth is, the image of the “starving artist” has a real grounding in truth. There is, however, good news: there are a great many arts-related careers that may not occur to creative youngsters yet which offer interesting career options. Here are some.

Teaching

Film school, arts school, design school, music school … there are a great many places for artists to learn their trade, with classes taught by trained professionals. Teaching can be a useful source of income for creatives, and chances are there’s at least one arts-related school in your community.

In addition, there are often teaching opportunities in public schools and colleges, though you will almost certainly need a strong portfolio of work to prove your skill level. Public schools will also probably require a teaching certificate. However, many artists simply put up posters in their neighborhood and charge by the hour.

Business management

Some artists act as if talking about the business side of the arts is somehow crass, but real professionals know that business is the backbone of creativity -- after all, you can’t say “arts business” without “business.” Amazingly, a great many artists not only treat business as completely separate from their creative efforts, but they often struggle to master its intricacies.

Successful musicians have managers, producers and record labels; actors and film directors work for production companies and studios; authors still rely on publishers. These are the people who actually carry out the producing and selling of creative works, who negotiate business deals,sign new artists and much more. Chances are, they also have careers that are more stable and predictable than those of the creators they manage.

An artist who has a strong understanding of business practices will definitely have more career opportunities.

Marketing

The arts business depends on marketing. If you imagine the massive budget of a Hollywood superhero movie, it’s standard practice to spend as much (or more) on marketing as it cost to make the movie itself. No creative endeavor is complete without a marketing strategy, and that’s where marketing professionals come in, getting the word out about the album, novel, movie (or whatever) created by their artists.

These days, a huge part of marketing is digital, employing search engines, email and other online technologies to reach potential audiences. Of particular importance is social media marketing -- using things like Facebook and Instagram to promote and connect. Lots of marketers come from arts backgrounds, but a solid background in digital technology will be a great help in advancing your career.

Talent management

Musicians have agents. So do writers, actors and more. An agent’s job is to find work for their clients and represent them in negotiations, taking a percentage of the artist’s earnings as a fee. Agents are go-getters; they’re constantly out there, advocating for their clients. After all, that’s how they earn their living. Agents are usually confident, strong and sociable. They get a fair amount of rejection, and often have to encourage their clients.

Being an agent can actually be a lot of fun. If you love the arts, you’ll find that few people are as deeply enmeshed in the arts world as agents -- they know everybody.

Behind the scenes

Most forms of art involve a group effort to some degree. Film and television sets are perhaps the most obvious example, with crew members handling lights, cameras, sets, props, sound and so on. If you think about it, though, you can probably imagine similar situations for many creative fields. Writing is a solo effort, but publishing requires editors, designers and printers, music requires studio technicians and concert crews, actors need makeup artists -- well, you get the idea.

Many of these “support” jobs are creative fields in their own right, and while they’re unlikely to gain the kind of fame we tend to associate with artistic success, they can still have solid, stable and rewarding careers.

Career Paths in the Arts You May Not Have Thought Of

When young people think about careers in the arts, they tend to emphasize content creation: artists, actors, musicians, writers and so on. Creators are, of course, the backbone of the arts world, and of course without artists we wouldn’t have all the amazing content that brings so much joy to so many people. The truth is, however, any student choosing a career path in creative fields will face significant challenges. Once out of school, creative professionals will face a great deal of competition, as it can be so risky taking a chance on someone new. The truth is, the image of the “starving artist” has a real grounding in truth. There is, however, good news: there are a great many arts-related careers that may not occur to creative youngsters yet which offer interesting career options. Here are some.

 

Teaching

Film school, arts school, design school, music school … there are a great many places for artists to learn their trade, with classes taught by trained professionals. Teaching can be a useful source of income for creatives, and chances are there’s at least one arts-related school in your community.

In addition, there are often teaching opportunities in public schools and colleges, though you will almost certainly need a strong portfolio of work to prove your skill level. Public schools will also probably require a teaching certificate. However, many artists simply put up posters in their neighborhood and charge by the hour.

 

Business management

Some artists act as if talking about the business side of the arts is somehow crass, but real professionals know that business is the backbone of creativity -- after all, you can’t say “arts business” without “business.” Amazingly, a great many artists not only treat business as completely separate from their creative efforts, but they often struggle to master its intricacies.

Successful musicians have managers, producers and record labels; actors and film directors work for production companies and studios; authors still rely on publishers. These are the people who actually carry out the producing and selling of creative works, who negotiate business deals,sign new artists and much more. Chances are, they also have careers that are more stable and predictable than those of the creators they manage.

An artist who has a strong understanding of business practices will definitely have more career opportunities.

 

Marketing

The arts business depends on marketing. If you imagine the massive budget of a Hollywood superhero movie, it’s standard practice to spend as much (or more) on marketing as it cost to make the movie itself. No creative endeavor is complete without a marketing strategy, and that’s where marketing professionals come in, getting the word out about the album, novel, movie (or whatever) created by their artists.

These days, a huge part of marketing is digital, employing search engines, email and other online technologies to reach potential audiences. Of particular importance is social media marketing -- using things like Facebook and Instagram to promote and connect. Lots of marketers come from arts backgrounds, but a solid background in digital technology will be a great help in advancing your career.

 

Talent management

Musicians have agents. So do writers, actors and more. An agent’s job is to find work for their clients and represent them in negotiations, taking a percentage of the artist’s earnings as a fee. Agents are go-getters; they’re constantly out there, advocating for their clients. After all, that’s how they earn their living. Agents are usually confident, strong and sociable. They get a fair amount of rejection, and often have to encourage their clients.

Being an agent can actually be a lot of fun. If you love the arts, you’ll find that few people are as deeply enmeshed in the arts world as agents -- they know everybody.

 

Behind the scenes

Most forms of art involve a group effort to some degree. Film and television sets are perhaps the most obvious example, with crew members handling lights, cameras, sets, props, sound and so on. If you think about it, though, you can probably imagine similar situations for many creative fields. Writing is a solo effort, but publishing requires editors, designers and printers, music requires studio technicians and concert crews, actors need makeup artists -- well, you get the idea.

Many of these “support” jobs are creative fields in their own right, and while they’re unlikely to gain the kind of fame we tend to associate with artistic success, they can still have solid, stable and rewarding careers.

Celebrating our incredible tutors for National Tutoring Week

At Tutor Doctor we’re committed to helping our students achieve their academic potential, whether that’s getting the grades needed to attend the college of their dreams or increasing their confidence in class. Simply put, making a difference is at the very heart of what we do.

This could not be achieved without our incredible tutors. Every day our tutors are making a profound difference in the lives of our families, in our communities and our organization, and we are extremely proud of the work they do!

This week is National Tutoring Week, so we wanted to share some incredible stories about how our tutors are making a difference across the globe.
 

 “When we first came on board we were very happy with our first tutor Ashley and were very disappointed that she found a new job that would not allow her to tutor anymore. Jenny enjoyed Ashley as she was young and the connection was wonderful. After speaking with the Tutor Doctor staff, they assured me that they would match Jenny with another great tutor. Enter Cami. She had an immediate love for my little girl. It was special from the beginning like a mother-daughter relationship. This means so much to me since Jenny lost her mother in June 2015. Cami will go by Starbucks before coming by every Thursday evening. They relax and talk for a bit before getting busy with homework. Cami took Jenny shopping on a Saturday for making the A/B honor roll. Not because she felt she had to but because she LOVED being with Jenny. Jenny has been on a very good trajectory on her grades which is now above a 3.0 (proud daddy)! I am very thankful for Tutor Doctor and especially proud to call Cami our friend. I give the highest marks to both Tutor Doctor and our Cami. She is much more than just a tutor.”

“Cath is incredible! Our daughter was nearly two years behind and lacked a huge amount of confidence. Cath has really understood our daughter and brought out her confidence and ability to perform in school. Before, our daughter would not have raised her hand, whereas now, she always tries her best as doesn't worry about getting things wrong. She even showed some of her class mates various games and helping them with their maths!! She recently got an award from the head mistress for her hard work at maths and I have never seen her so happy! We send the reports to school and the school and tutor work well together. We will be staying with our tutor until the end of secondary (if we can!) as they have such a fantastic bond. I always hear them chuckling and having fun. Our daughter absolutely loves maths now and wants to do more and more. Thank you Cath.”

“Stan has been my son's tutor for most of this school year and we feel so lucky to have him. He makes learning a fun and positive experience for Brody and always encourages and motivates him to do his best. Stan has made a great impact on Brody's academic success, by providing tools and strategies to help overcome his learning challenges. Thank you, Stan, for all you've done!”

“Within a short amount of time Marilyn has taken my son leaps and bounds. My son struggles with learning issues but Marilyn seems to connect with him using multiple strategies and activities. She keeps trying until she finds a meaningful way to help him to connect with the learning. He now looks forward to his tutoring sessions and has started to really see the pay offs in his classroom. Her former experience as a teacher and psychologist has made a world of difference as she understands my son from different perspectives and can anticipate where he may find challenges as a new learner. My son's teacher has also noticed these huge gains since he started with a tutor in January. Marilyn is also very flexible, being able to change her time and location to best suit our family needs. We could have never imagined that our son would have benefited so much from Marilyn's support and we hope that her dedication to her students can be recognized as she goes above and beyond every session to ensure our child and our family has success with whatever topic she is tackling with us.”

“We decided to get a tutor for our Year 2 daughter because she had lost her confidence at school. We aren't pushing parents and weren't looking for academic brilliance - we wanted our daughter to feel happy and enjoy learning, reading and writing. She was getting caught in a catch 22 of losing confidence, not trying, falling behind and losing more confidence. Soizic spends an hour with her after school on a Friday - and my daughter adores her. She loves the games they play, the books they read and the writing they do together. Soizic has given her the attention and encouragement my daughter needed. She's reading more fluently and enjoying books for her age group and new worlds opening up for her. Soizic arriving is always met with cheers from my daughter - she's kind, patient, encouraging and imaginative tutor - we really lucked out getting matched with her.”

5 Ways A Tutor Can Help Students With Exceptionalities

A skilled tutor can really make a difference in a young person’s life. Indeed that urge to help is the prime motivator in why most educators do what they do. There really is no feeling quite like watching a struggling student achieve a level of educational excellence they never knew possible.

In truth, however, there is far more to tutoring than helping people get higher grades. It’s about empowering people, especially young people, not only in terms of their studies but their lives. Students with exceptionalities such as ADHD, dyslexia, PTSD and so on can face particular challenges in achieving excellence. Here’s how a skilled and caring tutor can help:

1. A good tutor can provide a safe, no-pressure relationship

For young people with exceptionalities, school can be very difficult -- as can life itself. The pressure can be immense and hard to cope with, while parents can seem to be overwhelmed with their own concerns, especially the desperate hopes for a good life for their child. An experienced tutor, however, has seen it all before. He/she will know what life is like, and what challenges the young person faces; not just life at school but at home and in social circles too.

A tutor can be a safe sounding board, a comforting voice in a young person’s life. The tutor wants what’s best for each child they work with, but a professional approach will mean they can be a reliable presence. The mere existence of someone safe to talk to can bring tremendous comfort to young people just when they need it most.

2. The assistance of a tutor can boost a young person’s self-esteem

A skilled tutor understands that boosting achievement in school is about far more than studying and doing assignments. Organizational tools, X-Skills, and much more are all proven to play a key role in improving academic performance. Taken together, a tutor’s efforts can give a struggling young person a feeling of “I can do it!”

It’s all too common for students with exceptionalities to give up on themselves, to lower expectations for not only their schooling but their lives. In truth, students with exceptionalities can frequently achieve magnificent success in school, competing (or surpassing) students without exceptionalities. Once this knowledge settles into a young person’s heart, the transformation can be spectacular. The world comes alive with hopes and possibilities that once seemed impossible.

3. A tutor can boost a young person’s communication skills

Tutoring is quite different from standard classroom teaching. Whereas classrooms consist of many students competing for the attention of the teacher, tutoring is a one-to-one arrangement, where the tutor is completely devoted to a single student.

This learning structure requires a great deal of communication -- the student can’t hope to be overlooked. This, however, provides tremendous benefits for the student, because the tutor will, by necessity, draw out opinions, thoughts and feelings from the student. This is especially true when the student has exceptionalities. The tutor has to make sure their work is “sinking in” and achieving the hoped-for results, and this can only be seen through conversation.

By drawing out the student’s feelings and thoughts, a one-to-one tutor will help a young person learn to express themselves in a safe environment. This will empower them to express themselves at home, at school and in life.

4. Tutoring can help humanize young people with exceptionalities

For a young person, a diagnosis is a double-edged sword. The upside is that it finally puts into words what has often been a source of struggle for many years. It also allows the creation of a game plan moving forward, a way of helping them overcome their difficulties and focus on achievement. There are, however, downsides: perhaps the most obvious is the social stigma that is often associated with a diagnosis of an exceptionality. This can affect the young person’s self-esteem and expectations for their own success. A key to this process is the feeling that a student with an exceptionality is that exceptionality and nothing more. They feel like something less than a full person. It can be hugely damaging.

A skilled tutor, though, routinely deals with students with exceptionalities, and is simply incapable of seeing young people that way. Yes, an exceptionality can present unique challenges to a young person’s path to academic success, but people “in the know” understand that every exceptionality affects each person in a totally unique way, and they must be helped in ways that are particular to them.

In short, a devoted tutor will treat students with exceptionalities as human beings -- as so much more than a diagnosis. They will have tools ready for helping them overcome those exceptionalities, and provide a safe, non-judgemental space for learning. This process of humanization can be tremendously helpful in boosting self-esteem.

5. Tutors can educate beyond academic subjects

You might be surprised by the range of experiences and conditions an experienced tutor has seen. Whereas teachers in school can only guess at the home lives of their students, an in-home tutor sees it firsthand. Tutors really have seen it all -- not just the academic struggles faced by students in every part of the country, but their psychological struggles too.

Tutors can therefore be a helpful source of help with academic and study skills, but can offer a safe voice in the lives of young people -- a voice free of judgement and indifference. This can provide comfort and confidence and even, with full parental support, offer advice on finding help when needed.

Portrait Of an Extraordinary Student Artist

In many ways, Cliffanie Forrester is an ordinary teen. A native of New York, she was born just before the turn of the century. She has an active social life, posting images of herself and her friends on social media.

While still in her sophomore year of high school, she took a trip to Uganda, where she snapped a photo, with permission, of a little girl. Later, in her high school art class, her teacher suggested she turn the photo into a painting. Cliffanie had been sketching and drawing since kindergarten, and liked the idea. Eventually she entered the resulting work in the P.S. Art program run by the Metropolitan Museum of Art (the Met). This is a program that showcases the best works of art created by students in the city’s public schools. The program routinely receives over 1,200 entries; a rigorous jury selection process means that less than ten percent of entries are accepted.

Cliffanie’s painting was one of the winners. Not only did she receive a $1,000 scholarship, but her painting was displayed at the Met. Her all-caps comments on social media made her feelings quite clear: “WHO JUST COMPLETED THEIR LIFE GOAL AT AGE 18? ME. MY PIECE IS IN THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART.”

It should be noted that previously, Cliffanie had struggled in school, but that changed. Indeed her prospects seem bright. She’s now enrolled in community college, and has well over 15,000 followers on social media (a crucial ingredient in a modern arts career).

Local Family Enrollments (Aug-2017)

School / Student grade / Tutoring Program Focus

Franklin HS, 9, X-Skills, Academic Coaching
West Sylvan MS, 8, ESL, Reading Comprehension
Holy Family, 8, Pre-algebra, test-taking skills
Oregon State Univ, Coll, Intermediate French
Lincoln HS, 11, pre-calc / English Organizational Skills
Glencoe ES, 3, Reading, Academic Confidence
Markham ES, 5, math
Sunset HS, 12, ACT test-prep, Essay Writing
Wilson HS, 11, Math, History, Organization

Four Amazing Students From Across America

Some people are just amazing. They stand out, achieving things that can be simply hard to believe. It can induce envy in some people, but perhaps the best reaction is old-fashioned wonder. After all, the human race is the better for their awesomeness. Here are just five amazing young people.

Andreas Pavlou, Sewanhaka High School, Elmont, New York

Andreas, from a low-income family, edited his high school newspaper and was president of the student council. While still a young man his father passed away prematurely, leaving Andreas to help support his family.

One summer while still in high school, Andreas had an opportunity to conduct cancer research. As part of his work, he made new discoveries relating to breast cancer, including a very promising combination of gene therapy and drug treatment.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, he won the very prestigious Questbridge scholarship, which got him a full ride to college.

Shree Bose, Fort Worth Country Day High School, Fort Worth, Texas

Ms. Bose is another teen who, moved by the suffering of a loved one at the hands of cancer (in this case a grandfather), engaged in advanced research in an effort to find a cure. She asked every research center in her area to let her work but no one took her seriously -- except for the North Texas Science Health Center, which agreed to give her access to their labs plus mentoring.

She focused on the chemotherapy drug Cisplatin, and discovered that inhibiting a specific protein allowed the drug to be much more effective in killing cancer cells. She says, "For the over 240,000 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, this research will hopefully be able to reduce the recurrence rates in patients treated with particular chemotherapy drugs in the future."

Thanks to her work, Ms. Bose won numerous science prizes, scored an internship at the National Institutes of Health and was accepted into Harvard.

Athena Kan, River Hill High School, Clarksville, Maryland

While serving an internship at Johns Hopkins, Ms. Kan performed research into healthcare inequalities among minority groups, even presenting her findings at a medical conference. This inspired her to take an active role in the field of public health, founding a health fair called CHOICE (Coalition Halting Obesity in Children Everywhere). This brought together dozens of exhibitors -- ranging from nonprofits to private corporations -- along with free health screening. She also served on a county-level public health committee.

Ms. Kan received a full scholarship to Harvard.

Anvita Gupta, BASIS High School, Scottsdale, Arizona

Ms. Gupta combined an interest in computer science with a passion for biology by creating software that automatically identifies medications for diseases like cancer and ebola, thereby boosting research into new drugs.

Her achievement won her several high-level science prizes, including a presentation at the White House Science Fair. She also gained entrance to Stanford (computer science and biology).

As if that wasn’t enough, Ms. Gupta was struck by the dropout rate of girls in her AP computer science class, with three-quarters of the girls leaving the course. So she founded LITAS, a computer science club for middle school girls. The club, which is designed to increase female participation in STEM fields, has won sponsorship from Google, among other high-profile organizations.

Toward a Better Understanding: Dyslexia

Reading is a vital skill; it’s hard to imagine doing well in school, or in life, when reading and writing are a struggle. Yet people with dyslexia deal with this every day. It makes school more difficult, it makes socializing more difficult, and it damages self-esteem. People with dyslexia face many obstacles in life, but perhaps the worst is the assumption many people make -- that they have sub-par intelligence. This, however, is not the case, and while dyslexia can present many challenges, it does not preclude a happy, prosperous life.

What is dyslexia?

A common misconception is that dyslexia is a visual disorder in which the brain mixes up the order of letters when reading. This, however, is not the case. In truth, it is a neurological problem that affects the brain’s ability to process graphic symbols. It can also make it difficult to associate words and symbols with their accompanying sounds. Other symptoms can include difficulty in telling left from right, an inability to retain knowledge of spelling and pronunciation, shorter attention span, and, a higher rate of autoimmune illnesses. Furthermore, people with dyslexia have a higher rate of ADHD.

What causes dyslexia?

There are plenty of theories, but no one knows for sure. The current thinking leans towards a genetic source, since dyslexia often runs in families. However there is no firm evidence of this.

Dyslexia, unfortunately, is not temporary; it is a lifelong affliction.

Are people with dyslexia less intelligent?

Absolutely not! In fact, people with dyslexia are often unusually bright. Indeed there is a theory that suggests that, similar to the idea of a lost sense increases the sensitivity of the remaining senses, dyslexia may wind up sharpening other parts of the brain. In truth there is a long list of remarkable people with dyslexia who have attained stunning success, such as Steven Spielberg, Pablo Picasso and even Albert Einstein.

It is crucially important to recognize that dyslexia is not in any way a reflection of intelligence. Children with dyslexia especially need constant reminding of this fact, because chances are they will frequently feel like they are less smart than their peers.

What is the treatment for dyslexia?

At present there is no treatment or medication for dyslexia. There are, however, coping strategies that can work around the disorder. For instance, while it may be extremely difficult to make sense of the written word, people with dyslexia are likely to instantly comprehend when those same words are read out loud to them. Indeed this is a standard approach to dealing with dyslexia.

At the same time, there is a good chance that a young person with dyslexia may be gifted in other ways, sometimes spectacularly so -- indeed many people refer to dyslexia as a “gift” for this reason. The important thing to remember is that a diagnosis of dyslexia is in no way a sentence of doom. People with dyslexia can dream just as big, and make those dreams come true.

Older Posts >>
Please Contact Me
My Name: *
My Email Address: *
My Phone Number:
My Student(s) Needs:
We don't spam or share your information with 3rd parties.